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20130122
20130122
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of energy in the world, needs to redouble its efforts. the pentagon is already moving in the right direction, but it's not just about saving money in the long term. it's providing operational flexibility and reducing velarde nurblet from inefficient and dangerous fossil fuels. those fuel tanker trucks in afghanistan and iraq might as well have had great big bull's eyes on them for terrorists. the military knows this, and we should give maximum support even in a time of gradually reducing pentagon budgets. this will pay dividends for defense and to the family budget if the pentagon gets it right. it's clear that america is ready and equal to this challenge. the president has signaled his interests in leadership. the question is whether congress is equal to the challenge, ready with innovation, cooperation and leadership. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, for five minutes. mr. poe: mr. speaker, in a remote region of algeria at an oil and gas facility in the dark of night before the sun rose, workers from all over the world were getting ready to si
building the pentagon three times, go on 179 round trips to the moon, or build the keystone xl pipeline twice. president obama has won more inaugural event to attend to. that is this morning. the president and vice-president joe biden will be attending a prayer service at the national cathedral. that begins around 9:45. you can watch it on c-span3 or listen to it here on c-span radio. acts at about 10:30. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >[video clip] >> from the start, organized military of always spent a lot of their time fighting a conventional, a regular warfare. those terms don't make a heck of a lot of sense. that's one of the big takeaways that i had from doing six years of reading and research for this book. the way we think about this entire subject is all messed up. we think that somehow conventional warfare is the norm, but the way you want to fight is to have these the conventional armies slugging it out in the open. but the reality is those have always been the exception. think about the more modern world. was the last conventional war that we saw? it
a budget that is completely taken up by entitlements in the pentagon. and that will be the only thing we're capable of funding. it's the only thing we'll be able to use the power of some progressive government to try to change. you can't be -- i don't think you can be a really good advocate for education, if at the same time, you also don't make a powerful argument to get our priorities in order and make sure that we're capable, as a society, of responding to what we need to, because we are not fixed into a budget math problem that is so intractable as senator coburn says, that we sort of just drive off the edge. >> and michael, we have no money for discretionary domestic spending to invest in education, infrastructure, r&d. >> right. >> the things that government, we've grown to expect government to do, if we don't take care of medicare and medicaid. we say it time and time again, yet i get politicians on this show that still pretend that you can take care of waste, fraud, and abuse. and we'll take care of it. and they'll be selling some of the spectacle. >> and foreign aid. >> yeah, le
to the tune of i think around $89 billion that are going to be put on the pentagon and domestic spending. they're dumb cuts. we are not looking at specific programs in evaluating their worth and eliminating some and keeping others. we just like, chop. this is no way to budget for a nation, and i hope we can delay the sequester. but it's coming up soon. republicans have vowed they want even more cuts maybe in addition to the sequester to negotiate, and i think we should remind everybody we've already had $1.7 trillion in cuts and we just did $600 billion in new revenue. that's about $2.3 trillion, mr. speaker, and, you know, how much more -- how much more cutting do we need to do, particularly when we talk about vital programs for americans? so, mr. speaker, i think if we're going to do cuts we should cut things that we really don't need. for example, medicare part d, passed in 2003, prohibits medicare from negotiating drug prices with the pharmaceutical companies. now, the veterans administration does negotiate for drug prices all the time, but medicare is prohibited from doing so. basically i
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4